Honor, Virtus et Potestas

Posts tagged “Medieval Combat

COME JOIN US!

Come join us for what will perhaps be the most rewarding martial arts experience of your life. You will find an incredible art with many difference aspects and skill sets as well as camaraderie, and a perhaps even a group of people you might end up calling part of your family. Come join us if you live in or within driving distance of Waco, TX. contact us through our contacts page on this site, or you can also find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/ArtofCombatEMA/

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2015 Saint Olav’s Tournament Results

11221334_1663670177185293_8340400454919292521_nFor the past two years now we have enjoyed keeping up with our friends in Trondheim, Norway and their incredibly popular Saint Olav’s Tournament. This tournament is a competition of mounted skills in Historical European Martial Arts.St. Olav’s Tournament is held every year in Trondheim Norway. It takes place close to the Nidaros Cathedral. The jousting group Ordo Ignis, of Trondheim in cooperation with Olavsfestdagene host an annual invitational jousting Tournament. Six to eight participants compete in Skill at Arms, Joust and Melee on the historical jousting grounds of the kings holding in TrondheimHere are this year’s results for the St. Olav’s Tournament 2015.

Competitors/deltagere:
Bear Steinar Gundersen, Tore Gransæther, Erik Ryen, Bente Andresen, Per Estein Prøys Røhjell (Pelle), Ivar Mauritz-Hansen, Bertold Voss (Bertie)
Tournament Champions and overall placings included their points:

1. Erik Ryen, 288 points11209471_1664721303746847_3144854314929137381_n
2. Skin, 246 points
3. Bente, 166 point
4. Ivar, 98 points
5. Bear, 93 points
6. Tore 75 points
7. Bertie, 60 points
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Joust / dyst:

1. Pelle, 100 points (16 lances)
2. Erik, 88 points (14 lances)
3 Bente, 75 points (12 Spears)
4. Tore, 19 points10568791_1524446444441001_7518904786473560682_n
5. Bear, 13 points
5. Ivar, 13 points
7. Bertie, 0 points
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Skill at Arms:

1. Erik, 100 points (49 targets)
2. Bear, 71 points
3. Ivar 67 points
4. Bente, 63 points
5. skin, 55 points11796353_10153368154210339_6111141596386882344_n
6. Bertie, 51 points
7. Tore, 47 points
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Bohourd / Melee:

1. Erik, 100 points (11 crests)
2. skin, 91 points
3. Victoria, 27 points
4. Ivar, 18 points
5. Bjørn, 9 points
5. Tore, 9 points
5. Bertie, 9 points
We offer up a celebratory congratulations to all of the competitors, both riders and horse of the 2015 Saint Olav’s Tournament for their mounted skills and agility. It takes an immense level of dedication to training and a passion for the arts to achieve the skill needed to participate in this level of competition, and at such a prestigious tournament. Again, congratulations from all of us here at New Ulster Steel Fighting School of Medieval Combat Arts.

By: Jeff Webb

Pictures and printed information used with permission from the Family Hassel-Ryen and The Saint Olav’s Tournament.


Train Like You Fight, Fight Like You Train.

By: Jefferson P. Webb

While it is very appealing and actually quite practical when attempting to attract new members into your martial arts school or club to have a nice indoor training facility, there is much to be said for conducting the bulk of your training outdoors.
For years now my adult students and I have conducted our entire training schedules outdoors and in the elements. The importance of such training was once again brought to mind at last weekend’s Saturday training session when the wind chill factor for us was 7 degrees Fahrenheit. To some of you perhaps that is not terribly cold, but in Texas that’s on the cold side. Your body is naturally effected in various ways depending on the temperature of the environment in which you find yourself. In a dedicated martial arts school where we train to defend ourselves and those we love, we know that we need to be familiar with as many different environmental conditions as possible in which we may be faced with a threat to our safety. Here is where we call to mind the old saying, “Train like you fight, fight like you train.”

There are many people of whom have been involved in a physical threat situation within the confines of their home, office, or another indoors, controlled environment where the temperature is a nice 70 degrees Fahrenheit. But many times people have also been assaulted and faced with the threat of assault Bind and Disarmin outdoor scenarios. By training outdoors in our drills an in freestyle sparing, we have experienced what ice and snow does to the traction for our feet/footwork. We have experienced what mud and roughly ankle-deep water does to our footing. We know what the rain does to our grip, or what the frigid temperatures does to our grip because of a loss of dexterity in our fingers. We have trained in the three-digit temperatures of Texas in July and August and have become very familiar in what it is like to face a threat in very hot and dry conditions. All of this is done with one on one, and multiple opponents verses one person scenarios. Being experienced in multiple threat situations is another vital part of training like you fight, so that if you do find yourself faced with a multiple attacker situation, you do not find yourself mentally overwhelmed, thus leading to being swiftly physically overwhelmed. You will know much better what to do. You will fight much in the way that you have trained.

Not only do we teach adults, but we also have children’s classes. We do train them indoors because of their age. Exposure to the elements can be much more harmful to them and like any responsible martial arts school that cares about its students and instructors, safety come before anything else.  And without a doubt, I can say that I am sure that if my adult classes were held indoors in a comfortable 70-75 degree training hall with padded mat floors we would have many more students than what we do in our adult classes. But, the adults that we have in our adult classes are well versed in a variant of environmental situations in which they may have to defend themselves, and each one of them will tell you that they are better off for having trained the way that they have trained.

Do not limit yourselves as martial artists. Experience everything that you can possibly experience in your training and do it as near as can possibly be done to the various situations in which you may find yourself faced with a threat. Train like you fight, and you will fight like you have trained.


An Important Reminder: ACSMMA National & Open Sword Fighting Championships 2013

Knights 024 If you are an experienced swordsman/woman, and have the gear and courage to be tested by some of the most skilled martial artists in South Africa, then you do not want to miss out on the ACSMMA National & Open Sword Fighting Championships 2013! Here is the schedule of events as well as the location of the tournament:

Venue: Hillcrest Scout Hall, Hillcrest, KwaZulu-Natal

Date: 09-11 August 2013

Events, Day one (Friday, 09 August):

Morning – Rapier (any combination of rapier and dagger, cloak, or case is permitted)

Afternoon – unarmoured longsword (weapon type to be decided upon)

Events, Day two (Saturday, 10 August):

Morning – Fully-armoured combat (sword and shield, longsword, greatsword and spear permitted) these will be steel, rebated weapons, & will be inspected for safety.

Afternoon – Dark Ages Holmganga (weapons chosen by chance and to include sword, shield, dagger, and spear)

At the end of Day Two, there will be a feast for all combatants and their guests.

Durban Sword and Shield Club ask all interested groups, clubs or individuals to email draconus@polka.co.za  with their club or individual name and number of fighters wishing to attend this event, and we look forward to meeting you.

Come test your metal and skills in one of the world’s premier Medieval Martial Arts tournaments.


Interesting Perspectives on the Modern Tournament

By: Jefferson P. Webb

Codex_Manesse_(Herzog)_von_AnhaltAlthough there is a segment of the HEMA (Historical European Martial Arts) community that does not approve of nor are they interested in modern HEMA/Medieval Martial Arts tournaments, utilizing martial skill in tournament fighting (sport-fighting) is in no way a new concept. What reasons do some of the modern HEMA practitioners give for not engaging in competitions and what did fighting for sport mean to the medieval knights as seen through the eyes of one of chivalry’s most celebrated Medieval knights?

One thing that the author of this posting has noticed in researching other blogs, message and review boards, articles and other martial arts sites online is that there is a certain level of hesitation or lack of desire on the part of some (not all) HEMA schools, clubs, and organizations to engage in freestyle combat tournaments. And, when some of them do engage in such events, they are closed events within their own organizations. Naturally there are a number of HEMA schools that do indeed compete in open tournaments, but what is the mindset or philosophy behind others not doing so? There appears to be two main reasons that continue to recur the most as to why some HEMA groups will not engage in the tournament. (more…)